Christian Living

The Early Years: Diagnosis

It’s amazing what some time can do to change your view on diagnosis. In those early years a diagnosis was earth shattering, it would cause a lot of anxiety and was so overwhelming.

Looking back, I can see the pain of the trauma from  birth seeping into my emotions. Everything was so raw.  It was like salt being poured into an open wound.

For me personally, only one diagnosis really hits home; that is the original diagnosis that Lilly lacked oxygen sometime during the birthing process, resulting in a brain injury.

 

Acronyms twitter

Lilly has more acronyms behind her than some doctors. Words like quadriplegic,  focal seizure disorder with secondary grand mal, cerebral palsy, and many more.  A few of her acronyms often send residents at our local teaching hospital running for a medical dictionary.

Over the years, I have learned different ways to deal with her diagnoses and today I am sharing three tips on how I dealt with it.

  1. Bring someone with you to the doctor appointments. This tip was huge in those early years. The Hubby had to work most appointments and I would take my mom. It was great having that extra person for moral support and for an extra set of ears. I found my Mom remembered things about the diagnosis that I forgot.
  2. Take time to absorb the information. When Lilly was little, I would just keep trucking along. Now, when I know there is a big doctor’s appointment,  I try to keep my day timer light for the week around it. Usually the day after is an absorb day.
  3. Don’t over Google the diagnoses.  With so much information on the web it can be easy to get too much information.  I have found it can be helpful but it can also be negative.  Sometimes people over share about things and it can be negative too  you.

Diagnoses are tough, there is no way of sugar-coating it but I hope you found my tips helpful.

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This post is linked up at Mamma  Moments Monday, Dream Team, Titus 2Day

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One thought on “The Early Years: Diagnosis

  1. Thanks for your post. So sorry you have been through so much with your daughter. Your points are great other than I am a huge advocate of doing your own research. My son has some rare conditions and we did some huge research and got involved with top doctors and research that has benefited us tremendously. I don’t think we’d be where we are today without that research and God’s mighty power, of course.

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